dinsdag 8 oktober 2013

mind control - brainwash - indoctrination part 2

Captive Minds : Hypnosis and Beyond

"Groups which have all powerful leaders who control the environment, control all information and eventually control the way their followers think, have one basic thing in common : They have found people who are willing to take that essential first step of surrendering to an authority figure they hope has all the answers.
Throughout history, many people have taken that first step. Sometimes joining a small group, sometimes a large group. And sometimes, a group that engulfs an entire nation."
That powerful statement above, concludes this very well naratted documentary that focuses on three case studies to reveal the striking similarities in the indoctrination methods each uses to achieve long-term effects.
It is a film that serves as a reminder that we are all vulnerable to persuasion and long-term conditioning, and one that provokes serious consideration of the far-reaching implications of any form of psychological manipulation.



Religulous

Bill Maher interviews some of religion's oddest adherents. Muslims, Jews and Christians of many kinds pass before his jaundiced eye. Maher goes to a Creationist Museum in Kentucky, which shows that dinosaurs and people lived at the same time 5000 years ago. He talks to truckers at a Truckers' Chapel. (Sign outside: "Jesus love you.") He goes to a theme park called Holy Land in Florida. He speaks to a rabbi in league with Holocaust deniers. He talks to a Muslim musician who preaches hatred of Jews. Maher finds the unlikeliest of believers and, in a certain Vatican priest, he even finds an unlikely skeptic.



 Married to the Moonies



 the unexplained - UFO cults


A Clockwork Orange



A disturbing but yet very beautiful piece of film-making, Kubrick has created the ultimate study of mind manipulation in this film. It is a protest against reform programs that take away freedom of a choice, and the message of the film in terms of paying for one's sins in all eternity is inescapable, evident to a large extent in the sardonic nature of the tale. Although set in the future, it hardly feels like it is, this being because the message of the film is overwhelmingly powerful and capable of applying to any age.

  



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