vrijdag 11 oktober 2013

Turmeric: The Return of The Golden Goddess


Ancient Indians understood turmeric to be the physical essence of the Divine Mother. Modern science now confirms that it has therapeutic properties relevant to well over 500 health conditions, and may bestow on those who take it, protection from many common causes of suffering.
The author has personally reviewed the majority of 4,000+ biomedical citations on turmeric and its primary polyphenol curcumin, available to view on the National Library of Medicine's bibliographic reference database known as MEDLINE (and searchable through engines like Pubmed.gov), and has been awed by how diverse, powerful and seemingly ideally suited this spice is for addressing the broad range of diseases and/or disease symptoms that commonly afflict our species.
One of the novel findings that emerged in the author's comprehensive review of turmeric is that it expresses over 150 distinct benefical actions, describable in terms of traditional pharmacological pathways, e.g. interleukin-6 down-regulator, apoptotic, cyclooxygenase inhibitor, etc. During the indexing process the image emerged of a many-armed Goddess, due to how diverse, intelligent and simultaneous are this spice's healing gifts.
In fact, from the perspective of monochemical-oriented pharmacology, a drug with more than 10 simultaneously therapeutic actions, and without the vast array of adverse, unintended side effects commonly associated with novel, patentable chemicals, turmeric would represent an impossible, miraculous entity, which if patentable, would generate more revenue than all the blockbuster drugs on the market put together.
After some reflection on the mass of data that accumulated on turmeric's ability to alleviate suffering, the question emerged: are these many "evidence-based," scientific studies really just exoteric descriptions of "compassion" and "intelligence"? Are we now rediscovering through the optic of modern science -- albeit through the reductionist and inherently animal sacrifice-based methodology of empirical science -- the "spirit" of herbs like turmeric, whose very existence represent a kind of surplus of benevolent, regenerative energy that permeates the universe, bestowing its grace upon its inhabitants/creations? Is this not what the ancients meant, or saw, when they described the spice in Sanskrit as "Gauri" ("The One Whose Face is Light and Shining") and "Kanchani" ("Golden Goddess")?


Indeed, turmeric turns the entire drug-based medical model on its head. Instead of causing more side effects than therapeutic ones – which you can read any drug insert to see is a universally true phenomenon and which ensures the infinite expansion of the pharmaceutical market and all the associated medical services – it has several hundred potential side benefits.
While no food or herb is right for everyone, and everything has the potential for unintended, adverse side effects, turmeric is truly unique in its exceptionally high margin of safety vis-à-vis the drugs it has been compared with, e.g. hydrocortisone, ibuprofen, chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, nothing within the modern-day pharmaceutical armamentarium comes even remotely close to turmeric’s 6,000 year track record of safe use in Ayurvedic medicine.[1]
Despite its vast potential for alleviating human suffering, turmeric will never receive the FDA stamp of approval, due to its lack of exclusivity, patentability and therefore profitability. Truth be told, the FDA’s "gold standard" for proving the value of a prospective medicinal substance betrays the age old aphorism: "he who owns the gold makes the rules," and unless an investor is willing to risk losing the 800+ million dollars that must be spent upfront, the FDA-required multi-phased double-blind, randomized clinical trials will not occur. For additional details on this rather seedy arrangement read our article on the topic: Why The Law Forbids The Medicinal Use of Natural Substances.
Here at GreenMedInfo.com, we have reviewed over 4,000 study abstracts from the National Library of Medicine’s bibliographic database known as MEDLINE and have discovered over 580 potential health benefits of turmeric, and/or its primary polyphenol known as curcumin. These can be viewed on our turmeric research page which is dedicated to disseminating the research on the topic to a larger audience.
Some of the most amazing demonstrated properties include:
Destroying Multi-Drug Resistant Cancer
Destroying Cancer Stem Cells (arguably, the root of all cancer)
Protecting Against Radiation-Induced Damage
Reducing Unhealthy Levels of Inflammation
Protecting Against Heavy Metal Toxicity
Preventing and Reversing Alzheimer’s Disease Associated Pathologies
Again, what is so amazing is not that turmeric may have value in six conditions simultaneously, or that it may improve conditions that are completely resistant to conventional treatment, but that there are over five-hundred and eighty additional health conditions it may also be valuable in preventing and/or treating. Consider also the fact that turmeric grows freely on the Earth, and you will understand why its very existence threatens a trillion-dollar plus conventional medical establishment.
Learn more about this research in the video below, and please spread the information to others who may benefit from learning more on the topic



Turmeric - An Amazing Healer

Introduction

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is much more than the familiar spice that gives curry blends their yellow colour and imparts to them a slightly bitter or astringent taste. It is an amazing healing plant that has not only been valued for its therapeutic properties in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine for thousands of years but also has a significant role to play here in the West in the prevention and treatment of a wide range of modern day problems. It is an excellent natural antibiotic, and one of the best detoxifying herbs by virtue of its beneficial effect on the liver, a powerful antioxidant with health-promoting effects on the cardiovascular, skeletal and digestive systems. Through its beneficial effect on the ligaments, it is highly valued by those who practise Hatha Yoga.
The medicinal part of turmeric comes from the fleshy underground rhizomes of a perennial plant from the same family as ginger with large lily-like leaves that can grow to about 3 feet high. The rhizomes are harvested in winter, boiled or steamed, and then dried. Most turmeric is available as a powder.
Beneficial Properties
Turmeric not only enhances the flavour of food but also aids digestion, particularly of protein, promotes absorption and regulates metabolism. It is an excellent spice to add to cooking if concerned about weight. Turmeric helps to regulate intestinal flora and is well worth taking during and after a course of antibiotics and by those suffering from Candida or thrush. It has a long history of use for eradicating worms. I have frequently prescribed turmeric for digestive problems such as indigestion, heartburn, wind, bloating, colic and diarrhoea. It has a soothing and bolstering effect on the mucosa of the gut and boosts stomach defences against excess acid, drugs and other irritating substances ingested and from the effects of stress, thereby reducing the risk of gastritis and ulcers. It is said to lower blood sugar in diabetics.
Turmeric has beneficial effects in the liver, which include stimulating the flow of bile, protecting against damage from toxins[1] and improving the metabolism of fats. By enhancing liver function, turmeric helps to cleanse the blood of toxins and impurities. It has been shown to lower harmful cholesterol levels, to inhibit blood clotting by blocking prostaglandin production[2] and to help prevent as well as remedy atherosclerosis, thus playing a significant role in the prevention of heart and arterial disease.
Turmeric contains constituents including curcumin, tumerone and zingiberone as well as high amounts of a carotene, equivalent to 50 IU of vitamin A per 100 grams.[3] Probably the most important component is curcumin which gives turmeric its intense yellow colour.
Curcumin is a powerful, yet safe anti-inflammatory agent, excellent for treating inflammatory problem such as arthritis, liver and gall bladder problems. It has been found to block the production of certain prostaglandins and to have effects on a par with cortisone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but without the side effects.[4],[5] I have observed that taking turmeric daily has an excellent anti-inflammatory effect, improving morning stiffness, joint swelling and pain with movement experienced by rheumatoid arthritis sufferers.
Turmeric has powerful antioxidant properties, is reported to protect against the development of cancer, and has a long history of use in the treatment of various cancers; enhancing the production of cancer-fighting cells,[6],[7] protecting against environmental toxins, with an immune-enhancing effect and powerful antibacterial properties. In China it is used to treat the early stages of cervical cancer. An alcohol extract of turmeric applied externally in skin cancer has been shown to reduce itching, relieve pain and promote healing. In fact turmeric has been found to be highly effective at inhibiting recurring melanoma in people at high risk.[8] Research has also demonstrated its protective effects against colon and breast cancer.
Turmeric has long been popular as a remedy for treating respiratory infections such as colds, sore throats, coughs and fevers, skin problems such as acne and psoriasis, and kidney and bladder problems. It can successfully inhibit infection whether bacterial, viral or fungal.
Dietary Inclusion and Applications
Turmeric can be eaten regularly and liberally as a culinary spice. To treat infections and digestive problems the powder can be added to herbal teas, stirred into honey or hot water. The usual daily dose of turmeric is ¼-½ (one quarter to one half) a teaspoon of the powder two to three times daily between meals. Alternatively you can take two or three cupfuls of the tea between meals. To make the tea, place ½ (one half) a teaspoon of powder in a small pot, pour over a cup of boiling water, leave to infuse for five minutes, then strain.
You can add ginger or cardamom to add more flavour. Curcumin can be taken in capsules as a supplement, at a dose of 250-500 mg three times daily. Combining curcumin with bromelain may enhance its absorption and activity.
Powdered turmeric mixed with water or Aloe vera gel can be made into a paste and applied to insect bites, spots and pimples, inflamed and infected skin problems including scabies and fungal infestation, and infected wounds. I have found it very successful when treating acne, eczema and psoriasis although care has to be taken with the amount of turmeric used because it can colour the skin yellow. Mixed with honey or Aloe vera gel, it has been used traditionally to treat sprains, strains and bruises. A little powder stirred into warm water makes an excellent mouthwash to treat inflamed gums and relieve toothache.
Cautionary Note
There are no strong contraindications for turmeric during pregnancy; it is probably safer to avoid therapeutic doses during this time although it is safe to use in cooking. Regular use of turmeric is not advisable for those with obstruction of the biliary tract or gallstones. Overuse can cause gastrointestinal disturbances is some susceptible people. It is best to avoid high doses of turmeric when taking blood-thinning drugs.

http://www.positivehealth.com/article/ayurveda/turmeric-an-amazing-...

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